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Today I’ll be celebrating my 38th wedding anniversary with my very best friend!

Here are a few pictures that I dug up from our wedding day. Our wedding colors were mint and forest green which went well with the massive Christmas tree at the front of the church. It was the 70’s and we weren’t fancy folks, so no ties for the guys and that lovely wide lapel suit coat for my sweetheart.  I couldn’t find a dress simple enough in the stores, so I had this one made for $70.  I made the veil myself for a few bucks and I still love the simplicity of it all.Bride and Groom Toasting at 1977 WeddingWe both love Christmas, so we thought getting married in December was a great idea. We were on a tight budget and paid for our own wedding (mostly). Since the wedding was so close to Christmas we asked our families not to get us any Christmas presents.  The cool thing was that we went on a 2 week honeymoon and got back just in time to open all of our wedding presents on Christmas morning. What a fun morning that was! Sitting as a married couple for the first time in our little one bedroom furnished apartment near 7th Street and Camelback Rd., reading every card with reminders of love and commitment from our friends and family. Then opening all those precious wedding gifts from the people we loved! There couldn’t have been a better way to start our lives together.

It’s crazy to think that we’ve been together for all these years! We’ve changed and grown and learned so much about ourselves and each other. Even though any relationship that last this long has it’s ups and downs, I’m so blessed that this guy has been there beside me through it all.

These are just a few things that I’m thankful for:

  • Thankful that he’s been such a wonderful partner and provider in our family. Practical, strong, steady and careful with our lives and resources
  • So blessed that he’s always been there to love and care for our children.  I’ve never had any doubt that he was 100% committed to them.
  • Thankful that we’ve learned to appreciate each other’s interests and strengths and realize that even though God created us very differently, He designed us to compliment each other perfectly.
  • Grateful that we’ve learned to love, forgive and protect each other’s weaknesses.
  • I love that he’s a life-long learner and constantly listening, watching, reading and analyzing everything.  I’m continually amazed at all the information that’s stored in his brain. It’s such a joy to see that the same love of learning has been passed on to our kids.
  • Thankful that he’s been there to listen, comfort, and hold me through so many sorrows, losses and painful times.
  • Blessed that he lets me dream big dreams and encourages my creativity and adventurous spirit.
  • Most of all, I’m so blessed to know that as long as the Lord allows we’ll get to walk this earth together discovering new things, laughing, crying, and enjoying each other’s company.  Thank you God, for placing him in my life.

1977 Wedding PartyI’m so thankful that we still have connections to all the people in this picture. What a blessing to have known (and loved) them all for so long!

Thank you Lord for a wonderful day to remember your goodness!

 

I’m sharing this recipe for those of you who are looking for a great easy way to roast your turkey this year.

Our family has used this one for decades and we always get rave reviews about how moist and tender it is.  Never dry! Make note that the turkey needs to be started in the oven the night before you plan to eat it.

And if it’s not quite thawed the day before, you can quick thaw it by following these instructions from Butterball.

Turkey in the Oven

It’s great because you can put your turkey in the night before. YES, the NIGHT BEFORE you want to eat it and you wake up in the morning with the delicious aromas filling the house. Another awesome thing about this recipe is that even if you cook a large turkey, it comes out moist and tender.

I first found the recipe in a book by Emilie Barnes called “The Complete Holiday Organizer”. I was going to add a link to buy the book, but it appears to be out of print. Sorry. For those of you who haven’t heard of her, she was a homemaking guru before anyone ever heard of The Martha. I’m going to include the text from the book to give you some background. I hope you try it and enjoy it. It’s SO easy!

“Perfect Turkey Every Time”

” Trust me on this one. The white meat melts in your mouth. This is a SLOW roasting method, but once in the oven, you can forget it until it comes out.

Choose desired size turkey, wash it well, and remove the neck and giblets from inside the cavity. Dry turkey with paper towels. Rub the outside well with pure olive oil.  If you want to cook your stuffing inside the turkey, stuff with dressing of your choice.  This is optional.  It can be cooked with or without stuffing/dressing.  (Sometimes if I’m not stuffing the turkey, I’ll add a few whole pieces of celery, carrots and onion to add a bit more flavor to the bird.)

Set the turkey BREAST side down  on a rack in a roasting pan (this bastes itself, making the white meat very moist).

VERY IMPORTANT: Place into a 325 degree F [preheated] oven for one hour to destroy bacteria on the surface. Then adjust the heat to 180-185 degrees for any size turkey. (note: I’ve updated the temp for the first hour of cooking to 325 merely as a precaution since many recipes now call for roasting temps to be at that level.)

This is important. The turkey can go in the oven the night before eating it!

Turkey Slow Roast Chart

Turkey Slow Roast Chart

Example: I have a 22 pound turkey. At 5:00 p.m. Thanksgiving Eve I put the turkey in the oven prepared at 325 degrees for one hour. I turn the temperature down to 185 degrees and leave the turkey uncovered until it’s done the NEXT day about 10 or 11 a.m.

Although the cooking times seem startling at first , the meat is amazingly delicious, juicy and tender. It slices beautifully and shrinks so little that a turkey cooked at regular temperatures no longer tastes good. It cannot burn so it needs no watching. It literally cooks itself. ” I do feel the need to baste every once in a while, but that’s probably more habit than anything, besides I like to open the oven and smell the turkey.

A good rule for timing is about 3 times longer than a standard recipe. For example: a 20 pound turkey that normally takes 15 minutes per pound to cook would take 5 hours. This slow cook method would be 3 times 5, so it equals 15 HOURS to cook the slow way. A smaller turkey cooks 20 minutes per pound, so an 11 pound turkey takes 3 hours, 40 mins standard, times 3 which equals 11 hours for the slow roast way.

ANOTHER IMPORTANT NOTE:  Many newer ovens are set to automatically turn off after 12 hours (I guess it’s assuming that you forgot to turn it off.) You don’t want your turkey sitting in an oven for hours without any heat.  It will be uncooked and dangerous to eat, plus you’ll have lots of unhappy and hungry guests come dinner time.  If your turkey will be reaching the 12 hour mark while you’re sleeping, just before you go to bed, be sure to turn off the oven temperature for a few seconds, then turn it back on to 185 degrees.  This will reset the oven’s internal timer so as not to automatically turn off. Be sure to make note of any time that 12 hour window ends, so you can be sure to “reset” the oven before that.

Now here’s the cool part. Once it’s done, it will NOT overcook or dry out. You can leave it in the oven an additional 3 – 6 hours and it will still be perfect! Thus your roasting can be adjusted totally to your convenience. So allow yourself plenty of time. It’s better to put it in a little early than too late though, since you want to be sure that it’s done. That’s it. That’s all you need to do. Can it be more simple?

Many standard recipes call for allowing the turkey to “rest” outside the oven for about 30 minutes before cutting. This can be done with the slow roast method as well.  Besides allowing the juices to settle in the turkey, it also allows you to have your oven free to cook or warm other items for the meal just before serving.

I’ve been using this recipe for probably 25 years and have never been disappointed when I followed the directions.

One item I need to point out. If your family actually puts the whole turkey on the table as a nice presentation, then you need to know that cooking it breast side down will not be quite as pretty as what you’re accustomed to.  There will still be some crispy skin on the top side, but the breast will not be crisp since it was on the bottom of the pan. If you’re like our family and you just take it out of the oven and slice it up on platters, no one will even know that you cooked it upside-down, except that it will taste AMAZING!

Have fun and let me know how your dinner turns out.

If you missed the beginning of this list you can find it here.

I’m realizing that this list could go on for days, so we’ll see what happens. I hope you enjoy learning about what a wonderful mother and person my mom was.

 J Perkins 90th Birthday

11. Saturday was usually Mom’s shopping day. She didn’t learn to drive until she was in her 50’s, so when we were young she depended on Dad to take her to the A & P grocery store on the weekends. Can you imagine only being able to go to the store once a week with 8 hungry mouths to feed? She did a great job of stocking up to make things last for the week, but I remember drinking powdered milk at times either because she couldn’t afford to buy more or she couldn’t get to the grocery store. I’m guessing her weekly trips were also a time of solitude that she looked forward to, but sometimes she’d allow one of us to go with her. Those were precious times when she let us help her choose food for the week and maybe even get a treat.

12. Mom would sometimes bring home delicious fresh rye bread, deli meats and cheeses on shopping day. They never lasted much more than a day because they were favorites for the whole family. That’s where I discovered my love for a good deli meal. We had Munster, Colby, Cheddar, Longhorn, Swiss and American cheese with fresh sliced Ham, Turkey, Roast beef, Braunschweiger and more. In the summer sometimes we’d add giant slices of Beefsteak Tomatoes and fresh lettuce from my grandmother’s garden. Mmmm!

13. As the family grew, Mom and Dad gave up their bedroom so that all of us kids could have one. They converted the living room to a sleeping area at night and added a sliding door for privacy. They kept their clothes in my oldest sister’s room. I imagine that was quite a sacrifice since they had no place to get away until we were all asleep in bed.

14. She often planned a once a year summer day trip as the sole adult with all of us kids to the northern Ohio amusement park, Cedar Point. We’d get up early in the morning and walk a block or so to the highway to catch the bus heading for Sandusky, then ride a ferry boat from Sandusky across the bay to the park. We spent the whole magical day riding thrill rides, seeing musical variety shows, and traversing the skies on the overhead sky ride. She always packed a substantial lunch for us, then later in the day she’d buy those famous Momma Berardi’s homemade French Fries and salt water taffy to hold us over. We’d stay as long as possible to squeeze out every drop of fun until either my dad came after work to pick us up or we caught the last bus for home.Vintage Cedar Point

15. Mom let us choose what kind of cake we wanted for our birthday and I often requested freshly baked Angel Food cake with strawberries and whipped cream. I can taste it now!

Angel Food cake with strawberries

photo by Lacy DeVeney

16. In August of each year she took each of us separately on a school clothes shopping trip – I recall riding that morning bus in the other direction this time – to the Midway Mall in Elyria – just Mom and I, eating lunch at the restaurant in the mall and buying new shoes and clothes for the upcoming school year. This was probably my favorite day of the year.  Not because I was shopping, but because I got to have my mom all to myself for an entire day!Midway Mall in Elyria Ohio circa 1970's

17. A limited budget and endless creativity brought forth unique homemade Halloween costumes for us each year. I wouldn’t be caught dead in one of those unimaginative store-bought ones.

18. Halloween parties at the Vermilion-on-the-Lake (VOL) Clubhouse were organized by her. She dressed as a witch and made witches’ brew using dry ice. I remember dunking for apples, fishing for prizes with a clothes pin on a string, costume contests and so much more.Vermilion-on-the-Lake Clubhouse

19. There was a Christmas play one year, written by my sister, Sharon and produced by Mom at the VOL Clubhouse with the neighborhood kids. The stage background was painted by Wayne Crozier, complete with his signature mouse hiding in the scene.

20. Each year she creatively decorated our 5 foot silver aluminum Christmas tree with matching colored glass balls. Since there would inevitably be breakage in the process of unpacking and packing the delicate glass, the following year she’d buy a set of a different color, then the 3rd year she’d use a combination of the previous years. The tree was often perched on top of a table up and out of the way of little hands and active pets. You can see a sliver of the tree in the background below. I remember spending what seemed like hours sitting in the living room gazing at the ever changing tree with the colored light wheel casting shadows on the walls and ceiling. It was mesmerizing!Jaye at Christmas

Looking over these memories I can see so many things that I learned from my mother. How to use my creativity in decorating, sewing, having fun. How to shop wisely, how to plan ahead for special activities, the importance of saving where needed, but splurging once in a while…so many lessons that I still use today. I’m so thankful for her giving and teaching spirit.  What a gift it was!

There’s a bit more to come, so stay tuned.  Thanks for reading!

Does this bring to mind some things that you’re most thankful for about your mother?

Less than a month ago, my precious mother passed away. She had a long, healthy and independent life, having celebrated her 91st birthday in January. Of course, that doesn’t take away any of the sadness of having her gone. Even though our personalities were quite different, we had many things in common…talents, interests, love of travel, etc. In honor of her on Mother’s Day, I thought I’d take some time to remember some of the things that I cherish most about our 50 plus years together. She was an amazing woman and a true friend and encourager to me, while still being my mom.

Janice Perkins and Grumpy at Disneyland

Even Grumpy couldn’t stay that way for long with Mom around.

Let me start by saying that Mom’s primary love language was gift giving.  Even though she was constantly on a limited budget, her favorite thing to do was find reasons to buy us special treats and take us special places.

  1. She was always quick to offer a cool washcloth on my forehead when I had a fever
  2. Hot tea with lemon to drink when I had a sore throat
  3. Campbell’s Cream of Tomato soup with oyster crackers always hit the spot when I had a cold
  4. I always loved staying home from school and watching TV, reading books and coloring in my cozy spot on the coach when I was ill. Partially because it gave me a chance to have 1-on-1 time with Mom when all the other siblings were at school, but also because she always made me feel so loved and cared for.
  5. For many years, Mom made it a point to buy each of us an entirely new outfit for Easter Sunday. For the girls it wasn’t just a new dress, but matching socks, shoes, purse, gloves and even a hat! This special day of getting all decked out to attend church and then attend big family potlucks and Easter egg hunts was so much fun! It was even more special because we only got new clothes a few times a year.
  6. 1965 All Dressed up for Easter Easter morning was also filled with sweets and treats of all kinds. Another chance for Mom to show us how much she loved us and how she wanted to spoil us.  I’m sure her sparse childhood during the Great Depression motivated her to try to make up for it in our young lives.1965.04 Easter Perkins kitchen table
  7. She was also our biggest helper with school projects. Mostly she would brainstorm with me about supplies and ideas, then was my cheerleader rather than hands-on helper, so I could work through it and have success on my own merits. I’m so thankful that she didn’t feel the need to do most of it herself. What’s the point in that?
  8. The aroma of big pots of spaghetti, slumgullion or one of my favorites, Pot roast on Sundays wafting through the house welcomed us home!  I learned to cook from her without using recipes.  Now I’m not intimidated if I don’t have all the exact ingredients for a new dish.  I just see what’s in the cupboards and improvise something similar. Thanks Mom.
  9. Occasionally Mom made Liver and onions, which I hated. She always made me eat a few tiny bites, which I reluctantly gagged down with huge gulps of milk. She said it was good for me, but it always tasted like I was eating a vitamin pill for dinner. Ugh!  Guess what dish she taught me how to make first?  Maybe she thought if I cooked it I’d eat it more. Oh well.
  10. A little thing like Mom’s button tin brings back so many memories too.  Take a look at more about that here.Mom's Button Tin

And this is just the beginning of my list.  If you want to read more, visit Part 2 here.

Stop by again to see the rest in the coming days.

30 Days of Lists

I did it!  I took the plunge and signed up for 30 Days of Lists for December.

My daughter, Amy is hosting this project with her friend Kam and although I’m going to be pretty busy in December, I thought I could squeeze in some time to do this for at least some of the days.

I’m not setting expectations to create journals or scrapbook pages or even create a book or anything, but I THINK I can at least write a list a few days each week.  You see, I’m not even committing to doing it every day.  I’ll just take it one day at a time and see how it goes.

As soon as I saw the challenges for the first two days I started thinking of pictures that I could take to go along with a blog post with the list, so that’s probably what I’ll do.

Dec 1 – Before the end of the year…

Dec 2 – Around my home…

These are the first two challenges for lists.  I’ll have to get to work on them tomorrow.

Let me know if you sign up.

Happy Holidays!

30 Days of Lists December 2013

Mom’s Button Tin

Mom's Vintage Button Tin Today my sister reminded me of my mom’s button tin.

Some of my earliest memories are of my fingers sifting through this smorgasbord of buttons when I was too small to even get the lid open by myself.

As I grew older, on many occasions, I’m sure I dumped the contents all over the floor and watched the discs roll in every direction. Then I painstakingly searched all the nooks and crannies until they were safely recovered.

My mom wasn’t really what you would call a seamstress. She didn’t make our day-to-day clothes, but as someone who grew up during the depression she could handle any utilitarian task.

For years she created our Halloween costumes from scratch with lots of hand sewing involved.

She taught me how to sew on a button. I replaced missing buttons on my clothes,  but also used them to make eyes for my sock puppets.

Mom also taught me how to mend the holes in my socks, which wasn’t so easy. I really didn’t like wearing socks that had been mended, because the repaired spot was always lumpy and felt strange. Sometimes it rubbed the wrong way on my feet and just bugged me. When I got older I decided that socks were cheap enough that I could get new ones instead of having to mend them.  Now I use them for cleaning rags when they wear out. It’s much easier on my feet and my mending pile.

My Barbie doll wardrobe was created with a running stitch at the edge of a piece of fabric, carefully gathered into the shape of a flowing skirt.

I can still sew a mean blind stitch to hem my pants and dresses. I’m not sure if I learned that from her or in my 7th grade Home Economics class. Every person in the 7th grade, boys and girls included, were required to take Home Economics and Wood Shop.  I loved them both! Home Ec was the class where I learned how to sew on a machine.  We practiced curves and corners on paper without thread to begin with, then graduated to thread and eventually to fabric.  I still remember the gold pin-wale corduroy jumper that I made in that class.

I don’t remember my mom having a sewing machine. Everything she did was by hand.

Mom’ll be 90 years old in January and she’s still proficient at hand sewing. She hems her own pants, shortens and hems her shirt sleeves – they need to be 3/4 length, otherwise they get in her way. She also adds darts to the shoulder area of her blouses because her shoulders are rounded and she needs them to fit better.

Between my mom’s hand sewing lessons as a child, a hand quilting class that I took as a young wife and my Home Economics classes in Jr. High, I feel fairly comfortable with sewing.

I made several outfits for our kids when they were toddlers, sewed a red and blue baby quilt for my sister’s oldest son, Jason (I wonder what happened to it), made a fabric baby doll from scratch for my daughter, various crafts and some nice quilt squares that are still laying around somewhere. Someday maybe one of my kids or grandkids will make them into pillows or wall hangings or something.

Now, I’ve become the proud guardian of Mom’s lovely vintage tin filled with all sorts of buttons. When she was moving a year or so ago she was trying to simplify and decided that she didn’t need them all. She let me have the whole spectacular tin.

It’s more than just a button tin though.  It’s filled with so many precious memories.  2013.08.28 Mom's Button Tin 008 (640x424) Do you have a button box? Did your mom teach you to sew?

I’d love to hear about your memories…

Rough Mix CD Cover by Bob Ryan and Terry Hann

You may have heard that my husband is a musician. He’s been playing music all his life and loving it.

He was in a band when he was younger that made an album and now we get to announce the release of a long awaited 2nd recording!

Bob Ryan does all the song writing and Terry adds instruments to the arrangements.  They’ve played at local venues as well as at the Tucson Folk Festival and Sunnyslope Art Walk.  They’re anxious to share their love of music with everyone.

Hope you’ll love it as much as we do!

http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/bobryanterryhann

Pass it along to your friends!

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